Michigan Fresh Bartlett Pears and Summer Apples!

Our next delivery will be Michigan Fresh Bartlett Pears and Summer Apples! The deadline is September 2nd and the delivery dates are September 8th/9th.
We also have a limited supply of Montana Wheat products on this order. So if you want in on the wheat berries etc. make sure to get your order in ASAP.

See You Soon,
The BNF Team

Order Here!

Peach Season is Almost Here!

Hi Friends,
WooHoo! Peach season is almost here! This is shaping up to be one of the better seasons in recent memory. We talked with the farm manager, and they have had just the right amount cold days this winter. All the varieties have set on the trees properly, and there should be plenty of peaches to go around! So get ready for some amazing, juicy peaches.

Organic Maple Syrup

Our famous Maple Syrup is also on the way! We will have to cut off orders in a couple of weeks in order for the farm to have time to process our order. So be sure to get your orders in soon!

Delivery Days have changed to Thursday-Friday for June and July.
In order to ensure we get first pick of the best peaches, we are changing our pickup day at the farm. This means we need to change some of our delivery days to you. So please note the day of your pickup when you place your order. During the fall we will move back to our normal scheduled Wednesday/Thursday delivery days.

We are looking forward to another wonderful season of serving, and working with all of you. Please spread the word and help our community grow. 

See You Soon,
The BNF Crew

ORDER HERE

Fresh Georgia Peaches and Michigan Blueberries

Nothing says summer like Peaches and Blueberries! Next up we have our top rated Michigan Blueberries, that so many of you have been asking about.  Big, juicy, and sweet! We can’t say enough good things about the blueberries from our grower in Michigan. We have been working with them for 3 seasons now and have had nothing but rave reviews from all of you.
One of the things we love is they come in a box which is freezer friendly, The boxes come with a top lid so storage and access is very easy, so you’ll be enjoying blueberries for a long time.

Peaches
July is prime season for Georgia Peaches. Its when the biggest and sweetest varieties come in, so you won’t want to miss out on these beauties either.

We only have a few weeks to get ready for this order and fill the truck so make sure to spread the word!

ORDER HERE

Expect Extra Tasty Peaches (That Were Only Sprayed Once) – Here’s Why

Family Tour of Peach Orchard

Expect Extra Tasty Peaches (That Were Only Sprayed Once) – Here’s Why

Although we can’t say they’re organic (because they’re not), we’re excited to tell you that our peaches are reeaaally close this year! In spite of all of the rain we’ve had here in Tennessee, Georgia has been dry, dry, dry, and that droughty weather means the peach orchard only got sprayed once throughout the whole month of May.

Once.

Just for comparison, almost all of the peach orchards we’ve spoken with that are anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains spray their crop on a schedule: once every week or 10 days.

But we totally don’t get into all of those chemicals on our fruit. And we don’t think you do either.

That’s why we seek out growers who care about what they’re putting on the food they’re feeding their own families – as well as yours and mine – and always offer minimally sprayed (IPM) fruit, or an organic alternative.

The arid weather spawns another equally awesome quality in peaches – an over-the-top taste!

The Taste, The Taste!

With little rain to dilute all that peachy goodness, peaches turn out on the smaller side, but honey-sweet and sated with flavor. They’ll be juicy too, just not watered down.

These are going to be incredible, Friend!

Order your peaches now, expect them to be unbelievably tasty, and know that you’re feeding your family some of the cleanest fruit you can get without paying organic prices.

Late Summer Update 2019

What's Next - Apples Pears Plums Concord Grapes

What’s Next?
Late Summer Update 2019

The next few months will be filled with bushels of delicious fresh fruits and wholesome grains and dry goods. Here’s what’s in sight.

Dry Goods & Whole Grains

Each of these upcoming truckload sales will offer a great selection of whole grains and dry goods.

Apples

Our Michigan orchard has produced a bumper crop of apples for us. Beginning with Galas in late August or early September, we plan to haul in several truckloads of crisp, juicy apples throughout the fall and into December.

Stanley Plums

These European gems are unlike the plums we commonly find at grocery stores. Wildly popular in Germany and eastern Europe, the Stanley plum’s firm, sweet-tart flesh makes it an excellent choice for canning, kuchens and other baked delights, and for drying. Of course, they are wonderful enjoyed fresh as well.

Stanley plums will be available only once in early September.

Bartlett Pears

Juicy, sweet, and speckled, Bartletts are the quintessential fall pear. Put them up in jars, gobble them fresh, and bake a simple pear tart that looks and tastes like gourmet.

Bartlett pears will be available only once in early September.

Baby Gold Peaches

If you’ve ever tasted commercially-prepared cling peaches in a can, you’re probably familiar with their terrific firm texture and delicate sweetness. Those are Baby Gold peaches, or some very similar variety.

The Baby Gold is unmatched for putting up in jars. This peach also stays firm in all kinds of baked sweets; pies, cobblers, tarts, and muffins.

However, be forewarned: Baby Gold peaches are not well-suited for fresh eating. Their flesh is almost rubbery when raw, certainly not juicy. Furthermore, this is a cling stone peach, so be prepared to cut it away from the pit for processing and cooking.

Baby Gold peaches: unsurpassed for baking and canning. Not so good for fresh eating.

Baby Gold peaches will be available only once in early September.

Concord Grapes

We’re not sure about the grapes for this fall. It takes a good sized group of people to hand pick Concord grapes for us, and fewer pickers than usual have signed on to help at the orchard where our grapes come from. If we are able to offer grapes, they should be available in late September, early October, or both.

Did you ever wonder why grape flavored candies taste almost nothing like common grapes? Those grape candies are made to taste like Concord grapes – the deep purple, slip-skin, sweet grapes that Welch’s purple grape juice is made from.

These grapes make awesome juice – easy to do in our Mehu Liisa steamer juicer. Turn ’em into wine, freeze the grapes whole (mini ice pops, right?), or eat Concord grapes straight out of the box, which is what most people do.

Tim & Erin

Organic Blueberries, Grown With What?

Organic Blueberries Grown With What

Organic Blueberries, Grown With What?

While other Kentucky growers struggle to farm blueberries organically, our grower, Travis, is using some interesting practices that make his farm one of the healthiest – if not THE healthiest – in Kentucky. The reason is that Travis’s clever family also runs a worm farm for the very purpose of harvesting an abundance of castings, which they use on their blueberry plants.

Castings, or worm manure, are packed with minerals that are essential for plant growth, such as concentrated nitrates, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium and calcium. The castings stimulate plant growth and enrich the soil more than any other natural product on the market, making them the most nutrient dense natural fertilizer a farmer can use. As little as one tablespoon of pure worm castings supplies enough nourishment to feed a 6-inch potted plant for over two months.

Thriving on the rich castings, our grower’s plants easily produce big delicious blueberries without the need for chemical sprays. The berries taste better, the plants are strong, and the whole system is marvelously sustainable.

These, my friends, are some excellent berries!

Order organic blueberries here in season or sign up to be notified when we’re taking orders.

Free Gardening Webinar March 2015

 

Click This Link To Sign Up For Next Week’s Free Organic Gardening Webinar

Many of us who buy natural foods also grow organic gardens (or we’d like to anyway). Paul Dysinger, one of our local organic farmers is hosting a free organic gardening webinar on March 31st, and we wanted to be sure to spread the word. Paul is a great local resource with a passion for organic gardening.

Watch this video for a sneak preview of what Paul will be teaching in the webinar.

And click here to set up a handy email reminder and register so you don’t miss the free webinar.

Free Organic Gardening Webinar

Hi! It’s Paul Dysinger here and if you love gardening then you’re my friend. :)

I live with my amazing family on Bountiful Blessings Farm in Tenenssee where we’ve been serving the community for over 14 years with fresh fruits, veggies, herbs and berries.

So, if you love growing robust veggies that burst in your mouth with flavor (or want to learn how without using all that chemical stuff) then join me on March 31st for a free webinar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
The number one big thing you can do right now to start building a healthy garden that is resistive to insect pests and diseases:

by Paul Dysinger

Years ago my sister, a couple cousins of mine, and I, grew our own market garden project. It was a fun project over the summer and we were able to keep the income in exchange for breaking new ground on the farm. The farm was expanding and so we were given the new land to grow on.

It was hard work breaking up the new ground, adding amendments, and growing our crops. I remember having to jump up and down on spading forks just to get the ground loose…

Anyway…

That summer our green beans were wiped out by Japanese beetles. Ouch. Literally demolished. You could walk down the isles in the early morning and literally pick off handfuls of beetles at a time. It was fun feeding them to our ducks…

We never put up traps or used any pesticides or anything like that. But year after year we watched our Japanese beetle problem diminish and fade away until we hardly had any!

The “secret ingredients” we added to the soil is not a secret among organic farmers.  It’s simply something we’ve always done consistently every single time we plant.  But make no mistake about it:  What I’m about to share with you is the number one thing you can do to build a healthy garden that resists insect pests and disease.

Add a good amount of organic matter to the soil. Organic matter (compost/worm castings) is the number one soil enhancer. It helps balance out any soil and aids in forming good soil structure. It adds nutrients to the soil and encourages microbiological life which help make nutrients available to your plants, and so much more…

In turn, it helps give your plants a healthy immune system. Think of the plants like our bodies. The healthier we are, the less susceptible we are to diseases…

In the webinar we’ll talk more about adding organic matter, but we’ll also touch on soil structure, soil testing, and some natural things you can do if you already have a large bug infestation.

Click here to set up a handy email reminder and register so you don’t miss the free webinar.

The Wonderful Thing You Should Do with your Orange Peels

The Wonderful Thing You Should Do With Your Citrus Peels

Isn’t there something gratifying about using a food in it’s entirety that would otherwise be partially wasted; ground egg shells for the chickens, homemade bone broth from leftover beef bones, and fertilizing your tomato plants with banana peels?

How about using citrus peels?

These gorgeous candied orange peels taste as good as they look -almost like gumdrops – and provide some unexpected benefits too.

Orange, lemon, and grapefruit peels contain about 5-10 times as many vitamins and minerals as the juice of the fruit! That’s a big boost of extra vitamin C, plus some special nutrients that aren’t found in the flesh of the fruit at all.

Orange peels contain tangeretin and nobiletin — flavonoids that prevent cancer, diabetes, and reduce inflammation.

In Chinese medicine, orange peels are used to improve digestion, relieve intestinal gas and bloating, and resolve phlegm.

So candied orange peelings may even be medicinal, right?

White Sugar vs. Rapadura

We made two batches of candied orange peels; one using plain white sugar and the other, rapadura. I was surprised that they were almost indistinguishable taste-wise, although the brown color of the rapadura version wasn’t nearly as pretty as the white sugar. Maybe the entire peel could be dredged in chocolate to disguise the color?

Of course, rapadura makes these quite a bit healthier, since rapadura retains all of the natural vitamins and minerals found in sugar cane.

 

 

(Rapadura sweetened orange peels at left, sugar sweetened at right.)

Other Kinds Of Peel

We used orange peels here, but you could do this with grapefruit, lemon, minneola, or any other kind of citrus fruit you want. Lemon and chocolate are a classy combination, and we think grapefruit might pair well with a white chocolate dip.

Because of the possibility of pesticide residues on the fruit, consider choosing organic (or at least minimally sprayed) fruit for this recipe. (both available here)

No Special Equipment Necessary

Candied citrus peels are easy to make and don’t require any special equipment. We dried ours in a dehydrator to speed the drying process, but they can be spread out to dry at room temperature as well. Without the dehydrator, we found it’s best to give them a full two days to dry, so plan some extra time if you’ll be doing it this way.

Ideas for using candied orange peel:
add to oatmeal chocolate chip cookies
make cranberry muffins with candied orange peel
lovely addition to orange shortbread or pound cake
include in trail mix
sprinkle on yogurt or ice cream
Eat them plain for no reason, or for a special Valentine’s Day treat.

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

6 thick-skinned oranges, like Navels
2 cups water
1 cup sugar or rapadura
additional sugar for coating
6 oz dark chocolate (optional – we used 2 – 3 oz dark chocolate bars)

Method:

1.  Score each orange in quarters and remove the peel from each section carefully.
2.  Slice the peel into 1/4 inch strips.
3.  In a medium sized saucepan, cover the orange peels with water and bring to a boil. Drain and repeat up to 3 times. The more times you repeat, the less bitter the rind will be. We did this three times, and they turned out delicious, but I think once or twice would have been enough. Just taste them to be sure if you want to cut corners here.
4.  Combine the 2 cups water, 1 cup sugar or rapadura, and orange peels in a saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, and simmer for about 30 minutes. Drain through a colander, reserving the orange flavored syrup for another purpose.
5.   Toss the orange peels in additional sugar to coat.
6.    Spread the orange peels out on a drying rack to dry OR lay them out on dehydrator sheets. It takes about 2 days to air-dry the orange peels. Mine took 2 hours in a dehydrator set to 130 degrees.
7.  Once the oranges are as dry as you’d like, you can eat them, store them, chop them for a recipe, or dip them in melted chocolate.

 

Ideas for using the leftover orange flavored syrup:

Sweeten your tea with it.

Make caramel popcorn.

Drizzle over vanilla ice cream for an orange Julius sundae.

Use as a pancake or waffle topping.

 

Zimtsterne: Traditional German Christmas Cookie

 

Almond Spice Cookies: Rapadura, Spice, and Everything Nice!
Bake up some of these lovely treats for the family this season!

Zimtsterne, which means “cinnamon star” is a traditional German Christmas cookie made with ground almonds and sweet spices. In this version, we sweetened them with rapadura, but feel free to substitute any granulated sweetener instead.

There’s no flour in these cookies at all, so they’re perfect for anyone with wheat sensitivities.

For an old-fashioned Christmas tree decoration, punch a hole in one of the points of each star before baking them. Then when they’re cool, string a ribbon through the hole and hang the cookies from the branches of your Christmas tree.

Ingredients:

4-1/2 cups almond flour or home-ground whole almonds (more if needed)
1 tablespoon arrowroot powder plus more for rolling
1 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon cardamom
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
2 egg whites (I used “large” eggs.)
1 cup rapadura, coconut sugar, or alternate granulated sweeter
Parchment paper or a Silpat are helpful for rolling and baking.
Plenty of confectioners’ sugar for sprinkling and/or rolling

Directions:

First, grind the almonds. Place 1 cup almonds at a time in a VitaMix or food processor and whiz until finely ground. Be sure to STOP before they become almond butter! Repeat until you have 4 1/2  cups of ground almonds.

In a medium sized bowl, combine all ingredients except the egg and rapadura. Whisk together, until it is a uniform sandy mixture.

 

 

Set that aside, and separate your egg whites from the yolks, if you haven’t already done so. Place the whites in a large bowl, and beat them with an electric mixer until soft peaks form. That means the egg whites turn frothy, and when a spoon is dipped into it and drawn out, the egg forms a peak and then falls back over. Add the rapadura or sweetener of your choice tablespoon by tablespoon, beating it in each time. It will make a lovely thick mixture and give the cookies a mild molasses taste.

 

 

Fold the almond mixture into the egg-white mixture until the two are combined. Let it sit for fifteen minutes to absorb some of the moisture.

Once the fifteen minutes are up, your dough should be soft; able to be rolled out without sticking hopelessly to the rolling pin. If you find it’s too sticky, you can a little more almond meal, say, a quarter cup or so, to make it more workable.

 

 

Go ahead and preheat the oven to 325 F. Now it’s time to roll out the dough.

I found it helpful to place a piece of parchment paper or a Silpat on the counter top where I rolled it out so the cookies wouldn’t stick. And I sprinkled a little arrowroot powder underneath the dough and a little more on top. This worked beautifully!

Roll the dough to 1/4 inch thick. Cut out the star shapes and gently transfer each cookie to a parchment-lined baking sheet.

 

 

Put the cookies in the oven for 12 – 14 minutes, until they get lightly golden underneath. You want to watch them carefully here and make sure that they don’t over bake so they stay tender and chewy. It’s okay if they seem fragile when they come out; they’ll firm up as they cool, but still be beautifully soft.

While they’re still piping hot, sift a little powdered sugar over the top of each cookie.

 

 

Let the cookies rest for a few minutes on the pan, and then carefully transfer them to a cooling rack until they are ready to eat. But knowing the smell wafting through your house as they’ve been baking, that might not be very long.

And that’s it for the cookies! As a final note, though, we had company the day I made these. I offered one to our guest, and as she was leaving several hours later, she turned around and said to me, “Those cookies rock.” And yes, ladies and gents. That is a direct quote. I hope you love them as much as we did! Enjoy!

 

 

Concord Grapes: The Good And The Bad

Concord Grapes: The Good and the Bad

 Concord Grapes The Good And The Bad

Bad Things About Concord Grapes  (Seriously…)

I’d really hate to start this message off on a negative note since there are so many positives about Concord grapes, but for the sake of being utterly clear, you must know the facts before you place your order.

Concord grapes are not table grapes. The skin is more fragile, and the flesh is much softer. They are picked by the cluster directly into the boxes we receive without any culling process, which is a good thing because it minimizes handling, which reduces the opportunity for damaging the delicate grapes. But because they’re not combed through, some of the grapes may have splitting, you’ll certainly see some leaves and green immature grapes in the box, and the boxes may leak with juice and condensation.

Bottom line: Concord grapes can be untidy.


 

We offer Concord grapes once or twice a year, in late September and/or early October. Check our current order form to see if they’re available now, or sign up to be notified when we start taking orders next.


But They’re In High Demand

The main reason for their popularity is not because folks eat them fresh (although many people do), but because of all the wonderful grape things that people make… homemade wine, grape jelly, artisan vinegar, grape cider, and even just canned purple grape juice, which is easy, fun to make and absolutely delicious. Some of these grape crafters offer their jams, wines, and juices as neat gifts for special occasions.

Even this near-flawless box of grapes has a few squished berries near the back left corner and at least one split grape close to the front right. Not every box is this perfect.

 

 

How we improve our quality and care about your experience:

If you’ve ever ordered from us you may have noticed that a few days after you get your things, you receive an email requesting feedback about your order.

Naturally, we are encouraged by many positive reviews that come in, but the negative reviews give us insights as well and help us understand what kind of changes need to be made. This enables us to respond to any problems and to refund folks if necessary too.

 

Concord Grapes:  Popular… But Not Perfect

We only offer Concord Grapes once or twice a year in late September and/or early October.  And there are many enthusiasts who buy them.  These are the kind of grapes that deliver that classic grape taste like nothing else, and a lot of people are wild about them.

And yes, they can be drippy and messy, so it’s important to attend to them right away.  Some of the grapes may be split, and the bottom of the box may leak juice.
Although these grapes are very popular they are generally not very perfect, so we get a wide range of both positive and negative feedback about them.

 

Here are a few Concord Grape comments from years past.

I am loving eating the concord grapes fresh each morning. I washed them in a little vinegar water to keep them firm and fresh. My husband and I are loving eating them.

About half of the concord grapes I received were smashed and unusable. We set the box on the kitchen counter, and the juice leaked all over the counter.

The order was excellent. We processed the grapes into juice & made jelly after I ate a pound of grapes. Some were split but that is normal. I ate lots of them & they were excellent. The apples are absolutely amazing. God bless your service.

I ordered the Concord grapes. They were nowhere near as sweet as last year, and they were much smaller. They were already starting to leak juice everywhere, and smell fermented. I washed them and boiled them down the same afternoon, but have to add sugar to the juice to use it for jam. Last year’s were so sweet and good I could just drink the juice and it was the best I’d ever had. I made jelly without adding sugar last year, too. I am able to use the juice, but I’m sad because I was looking forward to that same wonderful sweetness, and it wasn’t there.

…The Concord Grapes were wonderful, too. We washed them, blended the grapes in our Blend-Tec Blender, poured into 8 oz canning jars leaving a little space at the top, and froze them. We will enjoy this very nutritious juice all winter long.

I don’t usually complain but there was about 1/3 of the box of grapes that were mushy. When I got home, the box had leaked in the car too. The other two thirds of the box are wonderful and we are making jelly tomorrow.On the other hand, the apples are AMAZING! We have ordered two more boxes for the next delivery. A friend told me about your company and we are thrilled to have found the good quality for fresh fruit.

Most of the grapes were crushed and mushy. When I tried to pick out the few good ones, even they cracked also. It was so much work to pick out a handful of good grapes that I eventually gave up.

I purchased Concord Grapes and Apples. This was my second order for Concords this year and both were really good. I had almost no waste grapes as I sorted them immediately but this year there were not even many split grapes. I made grape juice in my steam juicer which is incredibly easy. We are Messianic and every Friday evening we celebrate the start of Sabbath and our Messiah with Bread and Grape Juice. I have canned enough homemade Concord juice for one small jar for each week of the year.

Once again–love the grapes! Made wonderful freezer jam with them, and are we are all enjoying just eating them fresh too.

The concord grapes were wonderful!! I have made 10 pints of grape jam and 4 gallons of grape juice concentrate! So yummy!!

I ordered two kinds of apples and some concord grapes. The apples are wonderful and I’ve been making applesauce and we are eating them also. This is the first time I’ve ever gotten concord grapes and I am not really impressed. They spoil very quickly! I did make jelly with about a third of them and I am hoping to use the rest for juice today, but I did already have to throw many out because they were molding quickly. I am guessing that this is just how grapes work since they are such a soft fruit… I probably wouldn’t order them again since they are hard to use that quickly!

About a half of the grapes were “cracked” and mushy. I have purchased grapes for about 3 years and they have never been this messy.The grape juice had leaked through the container box making it sticky and messy. We had to wipe the box dry before we could pick it up.

The grapes were fantastic! There were some mashed ones, but no more than expected. They taste delicious, and have made fabulous juice and jelly. I shared some with family to make jelly, and they are equally as thrilled.

… by the way, the grapes this summer made the BEST jam. First time in 40 years we made wild berry/grape jam! I have also made a lot of Low Sugar Concord Grape Jam using Pomona Pectin. My children will eat this in endless PBJ sandwiches that they love so much.

We had some friends over for lunch today. We had a Mexican dish, then afterwards I put some grapes and cookies on the table. The guy grabbed a grape, ate it, and said, “”WHOA! These grapes are AMAZING!! I have NEVER tasted grapes like that before.”” The wife had one and she loved it too. They had a few more, and a few more, and enjoyed them immensely. I told them they were Concords. They said now we know what kind of grape to look for. They’re from Louisville, and she said she thought there was a co-op there, so she would check it out. There is just nothing like a Concord.

Concords. Are. Fabulous!

My kids were so excited when I came home with the grapes, and have been enjoying eating them very much. And I made several jars of grape freezer jam so we’re looking forward to enjoying that as well. Concords are always a huge hit around here. Thanks so much for making them available.

I had the best grapes ever. The man that filled my order was so sweet and helpful The grapes were made into grape juice that night and it is the best we had ever had. I noticed that the grapes this time were much fresher and CLEANER this year which helped us in the products that we were making. Made our job quicker and eaiser. And I ordered a box of JONAGOLD apples. Cant recall ever getting that breed before but they are great so thank you young man for your suggestion. I will be ordering again when grapes are available Thanks

My order was perfect. I got grapes and apples. There was not 1 bad grape in my order and the apples were just perfect. Thanks for what you do.

Beautiful grapes and apples!! I have been slow about doing anything with them, but plan to dehydrate the apples and make some pies and jam with the concord grapes. We have been enjoying them raw…yummm! And we are happy with the Ottos, who have them ready for us on pickup day!

 

We Want You To Have A Good Experience With Grapes!
Of course, we’d like to sell a boat load of Concord grapes. But more than that, we want you to have a good experience with what you order. An excellent experience.

We encourage you to order grapes if you want ‘em as long as you understand what you’re getting:  hand-picked purple grapes that may contain some split, leaky skins…  potentially messy, but they have equally been known to generate some of the most enthusiastic “oooooo’s” and “aaaahhh’s”  and “yaaahhh-baby’s”  we’ve ever heard.

On our end, we will continue to pursue feedback about your experience with the Concord grapes and other great stuff we offer.  And we won’t be difficult to work with if refunding is needed.

Just-picked grapes returning from the field in Michigan.

Just-picked grapes returning from the field in Michigan.