Whole Grain Wheat Berries, Flour & Such

To order wheat berries through our local co-op, click here to see our current order forms. We offer wheat berries locally very frequently, but not on every order form. If you’d like us to notify you when we take orders for wheat, sign up for our emails.

We can also ship bulk wheat directly to you, either in bags or pails. Visit our store to have your wheat order shipped.

We love Wheat Montana products because they are NON-GMO (non-genetically modified) and also Certified Chemical Free. CCF is very similar to organic, but it doesn’t incorporate animal by-products, like manure, on the fields. This is a good thing since the grains go from field to table without irradiation or pasteurization.

These grains are also very clean, which is super important when milling your own flour since a small stone in the wheat could easily ruin your grain mill.

Wheat Montana offers a nice variety of wheat, including hard white wheat (Prairie Gold), two types of hard red, soft white wheat, and some close cousins: spelt and Kamut. Other grains include brown rice, pinto beans, oats, 7 grain mix, 11 bean & pea, and golden flax seed.

Below is a little information about many of the available grains.

Hard White Prairie Gold Wheat Berries

Prairie Gold is Wheat Montana’s brand name for the hard white wheat they grow. Hard white wheat is slightly higher in gluten than hard red wheat, milder in flavor and naturally lighter in color. Bread made with hard white wheat has a sweeter flavor and lighter texture than traditional whole wheat breads; it is never dense or bitter and doesn’t require any added white flour or gluten to create beautiful light loaves every time. A good choice for those who are hesitant to switch to whole wheat baking.  More…

Bronze Chief Hard Spring Red Wheat Berries

Bronze Chief is a type of hard red wheat. The berries are a little bit bigger than ordinary hard red wheat berries, but other than that, there is no apparent difference. Bronze Chief wheat is best for yeast or sourdough breads. Although it is not as mild as the Prairie Gold, it does bake up a nice loaf and boasts a higher fiber content and a more robust, nutty flavor. More…

Hard Red Winter Wheat Berries

Hard red winter wheat is the quintessential grain of classic whole wheat bread; full flavored, wheaty and deep-colored. Hard red winter wheat is high in gluten, a protein that stretches to trap the air bubbles given off by yeast within the bread dough, so it is best suited for making yeast-leavened or sourdough breads. Hard red winter wheat is comparable to Bronze Chief hard red spring wheat, however the winter wheat is preferred by many for growing wheat grass.  More…

Soft White Wheat Berries

Soft white wheat tastes similar to Prairie Gold but is used differently. Because it is lower in protein (gluten), soft white wheat is best for baked goods that should have a tender crumb, like muffins, pancakes, quick breads, biscuits and pie crusts. It’s usually a bit more expensive than the Prairie Gold, but the results are well worth it! When I started using soft white wheat, and milling my own, I was able to eliminate the unbleached flour I had been using.  More…

Whole Grain Spelt

Spelt is a species of wheat that was widely grown in the Europe during the middle ages but has only recently gained popularity in America. It has less gluten than hard wheat, but with some practice, it can be used to make delicious breads and other baked goods. Although spelt does contain gluten, it can be tolerated by some people who have wheat sensitivities but not by people who have celiac disease.  More…

Kamut

Kamut is a recently rediscovered variety of wheat that is gaining popularity as an alternative for modern wheat. Kamut is actually a brand name of organic khorasan wheat, which is a relative of duram wheat. It is a high protein grain that is also particularly high in selenium and lipids. It’s best for baking bread or making pasta, but many who are wheat-sensitive use it for pastries as well. Like spelt, Kamut contains gluten but can be tolerated by some people who have wheat sensitivities.  More…

Brown Rice

Did you know brown rice could be combined with golden flax, milled into flour and used in place of wheat in muffins, pancakes, pie crusts, and other baked goodies? A good friend of mine introduced me to this idea as a wonderful alternative to grains that contain gluten, and it works beautifully! Just mill about 4 parts of brown rice together with 1 part golden flax seeds. Be sure to mix the two together before milling so the oily flax seeds don’t gum up your grain mill.  More…

7 Grain Mix

7 grain is a combination of hard red wheat, oats, barley, rye, soft white wheat, spelt, and triticale. If you’re fortunate enough to have a grain flaker, this makes a delicious rolled cereal or granola. If not, consider this simple recipe. In the evening, combine 1 part 7 grain mix with 4 parts of water in a slow cooker. Turn it on medium-low before going to bed, and you’ll have breakfast all ready in the morning. Serve with maple syrup and dried fruit. (This works nicely with whole oats too.)  More…

Oat Groats, Steel Cut Oats, and Rolled Oats

Oat groats are the whole oat grain. They look a bit like whole wheat, but they’re longer, thinner, and a little lighter in color. If you’re fortunate enough to have a grain flaker, you can flake your own rolled oats. If not, consider this simple recipe. In the evening, combine 1 part oat groas with 4 parts of water in a slow cooker. Turn it on medium-low before going to bed, and you’ll have breakfast all ready in the morning. Serve with maple syrup and dried fruit.  More…

Pinto Beans

Beacuse pinto beans are dry, they need to be soaked for at least 12 hours before you cook them. A good rule of thumb is that the beans will double in size when they’re finished soaking, so if your recipe calls for 4 cups of cooked beans, start with 2 cups of dry beans. Just put the beans in a bowl and cover them several inches deep with water and leave to stand overnight. You can soak them for up to 24 hours.  More…

11 Bean & Pea Mix

This is one way to have ‘em all. Beans & Peas that is. This mixture includes lentils, whole green peas, split yellow & green peas, black-eyed peas, baby lima beans, pintos, small white & small red navy, black turtle & pink beans. You can take it from here for great soups, salads, or whatever! Before you use dry beans, you need to sort through them to make sure there aren’t any stones or clumps of dirt in them. Even mechanically cleaned beans will have a few stones in them.  More…

Natural White Flour & Organic Bread flour

Natural white unbleached flour is certified chemical free. It has had the germ and the bran removed from the whole grain flour. Wheat Montana’s unbleached white flours are made from a blend of hard red wheat and hard white wheat, so it is high in protein (gluten) and especially suited for bread making but it can be used for pastries too.  More…

Golden Flax Seed

Flax seeds can be added ground or whole to breads and other baked goods, or mixed into smoothies. It’s best to grind them in a small seed mill or coffee grinder. A VitaMix also works well. Do not grind flax seeds in an electric grain mill unless you combine them with a non-oily grain like wheat or rice (1 part flax to at least 3 parts non-oily grain). Flax seeds are too oily when ground alone and will clog up your machine.  More…

Food Storage Pails, Tear Strip Lids, and Gamma Seal Lids

A 5 gallon pail holds 37 pounds of wheat. A 6 gallon pail holds 45 pounds. Our pails are made from High Density Polyethelyne (HDPE). They are food grade, white, and 90 mil. These pails are round to allow for the best airflow around them. They can be stacked 4 high. Gamma Lids: Prying the lids off 5 gallon pails can be a real pain, especially for children. Gamma lids are different – just snap the adapter onto your pail, spin the lid, and you have an air/water tight storage pail that is both functional and reusable.  More…

Oxygen Absorbers for Food Storage

Oxygen absorbers are made from a chemical compound that includes iron oxide. They are completely safe and non toxic. When added to a pail of dry food, such as wheat, they will absorb the oxygen from the spaces in the pail, and essentially vacuum seal the wheat. In this oxygen-free environment, your wheat will stay fresh and free of bugs for many years.Grain treated with oxygen absorbers will sprout, so it is still alive.  More…

Related posts:
Wheat FAQ’s
Getting the most out of wheat
How to properly store whole grains